Forum Post 16

Definitions of dyslexia by Moira Thomson - Thursday, 22 July 2010, 08:23 AM

 
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Definitions of dyslexia by Moira Thomson - Thursday, 22 July 2010, 08:23 AM
by Alasdair Andrew - Saturday, 26 January 2013, 5:38 PM
 

You may wonder why there are so many different definitions of dyslexia out there.  Or you may be convinced that dyslexia affects only reading and spelling.

Discuss your ideas about the definition of dyslexia with other course members.

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Re: Definitions of dyslexia by Moira Thomson - Thursday, 22 July 2010, 08:23 AM
by Alasdair Andrew - Saturday, 26 January 2013, 5:39 PM
 
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Re: Definitions of dyslexia
by Caroline Sweeney - Wednesday, 29 February 2012, 09:30 PM
 
The more I learn about dyslexia, the more I understand why there is no one definition; all 'dyslexics' have strengths and weaknesses across a range of areas. It's difficult and unhelpful, therefore, to have a single, all encompassing definition.
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Re: Definitions of dyslexia by Moira Thomson - Thursday, 22 July 2010, 08:23 AM
by Natalie Lynn - Monday, 27 June 2016, 6:43 PM
 

My father and brother both have Dyslexia and have faced a struggle in their lives but both overcame to go on to have very good careers, my father in engineering, my brother for GCHQ and now in international computing and telecommunications.  Both have issues with spelling and putting down on paper what they meant.  

My youngest at the age of 5 I knew their was something but couldn't put my finger on it he did have  slight speech delay but had been discharged from the speech therapist.  He could not hear the phonemes, couldn't sound out words, couldn't decode or blend but was ignored by the school.  It wasn't until he was 7 that I pushed for someone to see him as his self esteem was rock bottom and he just didn't get literacy! He was a fantastic mathematician and physically well coordinated, riding a bike, tying his shoe laces.  We initially got a audio processing disorder diagnosis and issues picked up with tracking, once these were identified we then discovered that he was seeing rainbows when looking at text on white paper and so he was screened for irlens syndrome. Which in turn led to a diagnosis of specific learning difficulties.  His school were very unsupportive and we moved him to a new one with a very creative hands on curriculum. He has thrived in this environment.  He struggles with writing and spelling and his reading was very behind but now with the support of the school and his lenses he is catching up.  He has access to a scribe and a software programme called clicker 6. 


My eldest in Primary school was top of the class for literacy and maths, he always had his head stuck in a book and he gained a place at a grammar school.  The first 2 years were fine and then for some unexplained reason his progress in English stopped, he would say that no matter what he did he just couldn't analyse the text.  In physics he was top of the year group and in the top 5 for maths. He was getting more and more frustrated with himself and one day he just came home and started to call himself stupid and thick for not being able to do it, he then mentioned that it didn't help that when the teacher started talking about the analysis of a passage he was still reading the passage and so missed out and would also get in trouble if he was asked a question and was still reading the passage. His writing and spelling were pretty poor too they had not improved. This raised alarm bells for me and I called the school, who were going to call me after the Easter holidays and raise the same concern.  They screened him for dyslexia and it came back as having great difficulty in 3 areas.  This triggered a PATOSS assessment and he is now entitled to 50% extra time in exams and tests and the use of a chromebook.  To assist with his writing speed and reading speed, he is borderline for needing a reader too but they are going to see how he gets on with the extra time as he has done so well so far.  When he was younger he was an early reader / writer but had difficulties with bike riding, tying laces etc. He was also screened for an overlay and now realises that there are gaps in between words !!!! 

All 4 of my family members are effected in different ways and so I fell it is virtually impossible to give a clear definition of what dyslexia actually is and could possible exclude some people from accessing support.