Forum Hidden Dyslexia for TA/LAs

Avoidance strategies employed by learners with dyslexia in the classroom by Moira Thomson - Thursday, 7 April 2011, 07:09 AM

 
Al's Photo
Re: Avoidance strategies employed by learners with dyslexia in the classroom by Moira Thomson - Thursday, 7 April 2011, 07:09 AM
by Alasdair Andrew - Saturday, 26 January 2013, 4:50 PM
 
Picture of tracy Lenthall
Re: Avoidance strategies employed by learners with dyslexia in the classroom
by tracy Lenthall - Thursday, 4 August 2011, 02:15 PM
I have worked for many months with an infant age primary child who has continually displayed many of the defainat, hostile, negative behaviours outlined in the oppoistional defiant disorder notes. It has been partly my role to work on a one to one basis to suppport this individual and feed back to the class teacher, in order to try and understand the reasons for his behaviours, and provide the support he requires. This child does take longer to process verbal instructions. He has appeared able to cope with language work, through working with him it was possible to identify that the child did have some difficulty with some numeracy work and found seeing patterns difficult. This was overcome using numicon ( multisensory maths tool) with very positive results. The child was also referred to the educational pyschologist and has been under constant review. There is therefore some evidence to suggest posible dyslexia although it remains hard to officialy diagnose as many of his behaviours also point towards conditions such as ADHD. As yet the professionals I work alongside remain undecided!
Picture of Eilidh MacDonald
Re: Avoidance strategies employed by learners with dyslexia in the classroom
by Eilidh MacDonald - Thursday, 24 May 2012, 02:32 PM
I actually work as an LSA and one of the children I work with does actually have avoidance strategies. The first thing he does is sharpen his pencil in class, especially maths, that is if he has one. If he doesn't have the pencil then he spends time going round everyone else in class rather than asking the teacher. He is using up lesson time, avoiding having to start work. When it comes to finding his page, again time is spent either asking his neighbour as he appears to not have heard the instruction. This pupil has been diagnosed with having dyslexia. As I am new to this job I have found having read the resources and the examples of avoidance strategies I feel I would be more aware to other children who have not had any diagnoses.