Forum - Hidden Dyslexia courses for Teachers

Learning and teaching styles by Moira Thomson - Saturday, 19 March 2011, 04:02 PM

 
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Learning and teaching styles by Moira Thomson - Saturday, 19 March 2011, 04:02 PM
by Alasdair Andrew - Thursday, 24 January 2013, 6:10 PM
 

Some teachers do not accept that learners with dyslexia may struggle to access the curriculum because their teaching style creates a barrier to learning.

It may be suggested that learning to adapt to the varying styles of curriculum delivery of different teachers is part of the learning process. 

Even if this is so, some still believe that all teachers should make some adjustments to their teaching to suit dyslexic learners – what do you think?

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Re: Learning and teaching styles by Moira Thomson - Saturday, 19 March 2011, 04:02 PM
by Alasdair Andrew - Thursday, 24 January 2013, 6:11 PM
 
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Re: Learning and teaching styles
by Kamil Trzebiatowski - Tuesday, 7 June 2011, 01:44 PM
 
As suggested in the several videos in the course, I believe that adapting our teaching styles to dyslexic learners will benefit all other learners, therefore I think it is imperative that it is done. Having worked at Preston Manor High School in England, I was well aware of the effect multi-sensory class delivery has on learners, those with learning disabilities and otherwise - appealing to all senses and learning styles activates different parts of the brain and is engaging to the students of all ages.

In my opinion, it is the teachers job ensure that they cater to all students in their classes; therefore since matching the teaching to the dyslexics' needs benefits other students as well, I see no reason why such approach shouldn't be taken by teachers.
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Re: Learning and teaching styles
by Therese Smith - Tuesday, 7 June 2011, 09:15 PM
 
So therefore, all teachers should make their classroom Dyslexia friendly and, match their teaching styles accordingly?
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Re: Learning and teaching styles
by deborah stead - Wednesday, 22 June 2011, 07:50 PM
 
Teachers using a multi-sensory approach and dyslexia friendly strategies benefit all learners, it is the Teacher's job to meet learner's needs, not for pupils to meet teacher's needs to deliver a lesson in one particular style.

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Re: Learning and teaching styles
by Caroline McDermott - Wednesday, 13 July 2011, 12:29 PM
 

I have a "poster" in my classroom which says "if they can't learn they way you teach, can you teach the way they learn ?" (more or less what it says, on holiday now so cannot check it for exact wording !). Every time I look at it, it makes me think about whom I'm teaching and what I'm teaching them. As Deborah said, it's the teacher's job to meet learner's needs and not the other way around. Sadly, when I'm working in mainstream, I still come across teachers who don't do this.

Before I moved into SEN, I was a MFL teacher. I always marked the work of dyslexic students for content rather than accuracy. And my students knew that if what they'd written sounded correct (this applies especially to French), then they would get the mark regardless of how it was spelt. I did the same in vocab tests too; if I didn't then the students would frequently have scored 0/10 which was not on - the school was not, then, very understanding of dyslexic students and they were expected to do the same work as their peers.

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Re: Learning and teaching styles
by Denise Dupont - Thursday, 14 July 2011, 04:38 PM
 
 

I agree with previous comments, as teachers we need to ensure that we are reaching all children in the class and adapt our way of teaching them rather than expecting children to fit the needs of the school or to a teacher’s favourite/ most comfortable approach to teaching.

 
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Re: Learning and teaching styles
by Caroline McDermott - Wednesday, 27 July 2011, 08:59 AM
 
Positive marking is brilliant when it comes to mark the work of dyslexic students. In my MFL teaching days I always did this. As part of a course with Napier University I did a lot of research into dyslexia and MFL. French is the worst possible language for dyslexic students to learn as what you see is not what you get, eg jemapple for je m'appelle. I always used positive marking along the lines of, if when I said outloud what the student had written, then they got the full mark regardless of spelling. So a dyslexic student who wrote "le voh" instead of "le veau" would have got a tick for me with no spelling deduction as the pronunciation of both is the same. I generally used this format for all my junior students regardless of whether or not they were dyslexic. Were I not to have done this for my dyslexic students, then I would have anihilated their self-esteem and morale because, with very few exceptions, dyslexic student struggle dreadfullly with French spelling. Sadly I've encountered few MFL teachers who share this philosophy.
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Re: Learning and teaching styles
by Irene McIlchere - Wednesday, 17 August 2011, 02:59 PM
 
Using a variety of teaching styles should not be viewed as being 'dyslexia friendly'. It is just good practice that will benefit all pupils, regardless of age, stage or ability.
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Re: Learning and teaching styles
by Evelyn Mullen - Friday, 26 August 2011, 10:38 AM
 
Yes many the strategies

and approaches we may use to make the curriculum accessible for learners with dyslexia will also particularly help children with a range of conditions such e.g. ADHD.ASD,DCD. It is important to remember than dyslexic type difficulties are a continuum and that each learner has their own pattern of strengths and problems. When we get the opportunity to work with pupils in a one to one setting or in a small group we can use this as an opportunity to allow them to work their own learning styles and just as importantly in addition also help them to develop and strengthen other learning styles and approaches.
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Re: Learning and teaching styles
by angela caldwell - Friday, 6 January 2012, 03:25 PM
 
I completely agree!! Having all been through the education system ourselves, we know that each of us has a preferred learning style. We must try to meet the needs of all our pupils - not just those with dyslexia. As someone said previously, they should not be expected to adapt to us, rather, we should adapt to them!! Surely, that is good practice!
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Re: Learning and teaching styles
by Betty Skelton - Saturday, 11 February 2012, 06:32 PM
 
Teaching should be led by the needs of the pupils so a variety of teaching styles a d methods are required. This is surely just good practice.
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Re: Learning and teaching styles by Moira Thomson - Saturday, 19 March 2011, 04:02 PM
by Alasdair Andrew - Saturday, 26 January 2013, 6:07 PM
 
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Re: Learning and teaching styles
by Alison Kirke - Monday, 16 May 2011, 02:34 PM
 
I think all teaching should be done in a multi-sensory way. This benefits all learners whether or not they have been officially identified as dyslexic. There may be many learners who have little 'quirks' in learning styles who are not actually dyslexic but who may find a multi-sensory approach useful. In my experience most primary school teaching is becoming much more multi-sensory but I think there are some dinosaurs still in secondary schools who don't really understand and do not believe that adjustments are needed.
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Re: Learning and teaching styles
by Niamh Quigley - Monday, 2 January 2012, 03:43 PM
 
I think all teaching should be geard towards all pupils. Different ways of doing something reinforces information to all children and helps the children with dyslexia at the same time.  It must be so hard  to sit and listen and write in all lessons primary and secondary if this is a difficulty that I would switch off if I did not get the chance to move or discuss or make things.
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Re: Learning and teaching styles by Moira Thomson - Saturday, 19 March 2011, 04:02 PM
by Neil Harding - Thursday, 6 February 2014, 4:39 PM
 
I fully agree. I believe it is the duty and role of any teacher to adapt their style of delivery and teaching to meet the needs of any individual.

The most enjoyable sessions I can remember delivering to secondary school and school leaver age learners are ones that challenged the 3 learning styles, relied on different activities and assessment methods to meet the needs of all learners.

The difference this made to attitude and participation was far more noticeable during the session.

The main negative I found was the time it took to prepare that lesson, unfortunately as we are all aware time is an enemey in education.